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Biographies & Contacts

Published onMay 31, 2020
Biographies & Contacts
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Editors

Lindsey Seatter (lseatter[at] uvic [dot] ca) is a SSHRC-funded Doctoral Candidate in the Department of English at the University of Victoria and an Associate Director of the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (Conference & Colloquium). Her research focuses on the British Romantic period and Digital Humanities, with special interest in women writers, the evolution of the novel, narratology, and social space. More information on her work can be found at www.lindseyseatter.com.

Alyssa Arbuckle (alyssaa [at] uvic [dot] ca) is the Associate Director of the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (ETCL) at the University of Victoria, where she serves as the Project Manager for the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) Partnership, and is a member of the Directorial Group and the Operational Team for the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI). Alyssa is also an interdisciplinary PhD Candidate at the University of Victoria, studying open social scholarship and its implementation. She holds a BA Honours in English from the University of British Columbia and an MA in English from the University of Victoria, where her previous studies centred around digital humanities, new media, and contemporary American literature. Currently, she explores open access, digital publishing, and how we can share academic research more broadly. To this end, Alyssa’s work has appeared in Digital Studies, Digital Humanities Quarterly, KULA: Knowledge Creation, Dissemination, and Preservation Studies, and Scholarly and Research Communication, among other venues, and she has recently co-edited print and online book collections titled Social Knowledge Creation in the Humanities and Feminist War Games?: Mechanisms of War, Feminist Values, and Interventional Games.

John F. Barber (jfbarber [at] eaze [dot] net) convenes with The Creative Media & Digital Culture program at Washington State University Vancouver. His scholarship, teaching, and creative endeavors arise from the intersection (collision, collusion?) of art, humanities, and technology. His creative practices with radio and sound art have been broadcast and exhibited internationally. In addition to his work with sound and digital humanities, Barber developed and curates American Dust (www.brautigan.net), known as the preeminent resource for the life and writing of American author Richard Brautigan. As a featured guest on This American Life, Barber talked about The Brautigan Library project where he archives and curates unpublished manuscripts by everyday authors. Barber's work has appeared in Digital Humanities Quarterly, Digital Studies, ebr, Hyperrhiz: New Media Cultures, Leonardo, MATLIT (Materialities of Literature), Scholarly Research and Communication, and other journals. Barber's website (www.nouspace.net/john) provides more details and examples of his endeavors.

Authors

Thana AlShakhs (tmalshakhs [at] gmail [dot] com) has a PhD in Comparative Literature with a minor in English from Louisiana State University. She has her Bachelor and Master’s degrees in Arabic Language and Literature from King Saud University in Saudi Arabia. She has received three scholarships from: Saudi government in 2013 to study abroad, The Institute of World Literature at Harvard University in 2016, and Digital Humanities Summer Institute at University of Victoria for summer 2017. Currently, she works as an Assistant Professor at the American University of the Middle East in Kuwait.

Gia Alexander (gia.alexander [at] tamu [dot] edu) is a doctoral candidate in English and an assistant lecturer of engineering technical communication at Texas A&M University at College Station. She also holds a graduate certificate in digital humanities with special competency in accessibility in digital environments. An inveterate book lover and textual scholar despite lifelong low vision, Gia has developed a process that combines digital humanities archives, TEI and Braille to produce accessible scholarly editions of literary works that are adaptable to the needs of different audiences. In addition to her DH work, Gia studies the material culture of writing in Victorian Britain, life writing, and technical communication.

John F. Barber (jfbarber [at] eaze [dot] net) convenes with The Creative Media & Digital Culture program at Washington State University Vancouver. His scholarship, teaching, and creative endeavors arise from the intersection (collision, collusion?) of art, humanities, and technology. His creative practices with radio and sound art have been broadcast and exhibited internationally. In addition to his work with sound and digital humanities, Barber developed and curates American Dust (www.brautigan.net), known as the preeminent resource for the life and writing of American author Richard Brautigan. As a featured guest on This American Life, Barber talked about The Brautigan Library project where he archives and curates unpublished manuscripts by everyday authors. Barber's work has appeared in Digital Humanities Quarterly, Digital Studies, ebr, Hyperrhiz: New Media Cultures, Leonardo, MATLIT (Materialities of Literature), Scholarly Research and Communication, and other journals. Barber's website (www.nouspace.net/john) provides more details and examples of his endeavors.

Heather Bliss (Otskaapinaaki) (hbliss [at] uvic [dot] ca) received her Blackfoot name from her late friend and teacher Tootsinam Beatrice Bullshields. She came to this work as a non-Indigenous linguist living and working in the traditional and unceded territories of the hənq̓ə̓minə̓m̓-speaking peoples. Born and raised in Mohkinsstsis (Calgary, Alberta), she is the granddaughter of Scottish and British immigrants. She is a proud alumna of the University of Calgary (BA Honours, 2003; MA 2005) and the University of British Columbia (PhD, 2013), and a former postdoctoral fellow at the University of Victoria (SSHRC 2014-16; Banting 2016-18). Since 2003, she has been collaborating with members of the Siksiká and Kaináí Nations of Southern Alberta on projects related to the documentation and analysis of the Blackfoot language, including the Blackfoot Oral Stories Database (https://stories.blackfoot.atlas-ling.ca/). She is a Lecturer at Simon Fraser University and an Adjunct Professor at the University of British Columbia and the University of Calgary. 

Christina Boyles (cboyles [at] msu [dot] edu) is an Assistant Professor of Culturally Engaged Digital Humanities at Michigan State University. Her research explores the relationship between surveillance, social justice, and the environment. She is the director of the Puerto Rico Disaster Archive, a project that works with community organizations in Puerto Rico and the Caribbean to collect and preserve stories about Hurricane María. She also is the co-founder of SurvDH, a community that explores the intersections between surveillance and the humanities. A selection of her published work appears in Digital Humanities QuarterlyBodies of Information: Feminist Debates in the Digital HumanitiesThe Journal of Interactive Technology and PedagogyAmerican Quarterly, and Studies in American Indian Literatures

Sean Butterfield (sbutterfield [at] uidaho [dot] edu) is Clinical Assistant Professor of Trumpet and Theory at the University of Idaho. He is a Bach Trumpet Artist and performs as principal trumpet with the Steamboat Symphony Orchestra (CO), principal trumpet with the Idaho Bach Festival, and a member of the Idaho Brass Quintet. He loves his current position at the Lionel Hampton School of Music, where he is finishing an open source music theory textbook, teaching and touring as a trumpet performer, and director of the annual Lionel Hampton Music Camp. Dr. Butterfield co-hosted the 2017 Carmine Caruso International Jazz Trumpet Solo Competition and is now competition chair of the Ellsworth Smith International Trumpet Solo Competition.

Fiona Coll (fiona.coll [at] oswego [dot] edu) is an Assistant Professor of Literature and Technology in the Department of English and Creative Writing at SUNY Oswego. Her research explores the intersections of creativity and technology, especially during the nineteenth century.

Inge Genee (Piitaakii) (inge.genee [at] uleth [dot] ca) was born and raised in The Netherlands, and received a BA, MA, MEd and PhD from the University of Amsterdam. She is now a Professor of Linguistics in the Department of Modern Languages Linguistics at the University of Lethbridge and Chair of the Department of Indigenous Studies. Much of her early work on Blackfoot was done in collaboration with Ikkinainihki Lena Heavy Shields Russell from the Kainai Nation. In 2015 she began a SSHRC-funded project to address accessibility and useability challenges in the Blackfoot print dictionary by digitizing the lexical database and developing a user-friendly web dictionary (https://dictionary.blackfoot.atlas-ling.ca). Marie-Odile Junker and her team in Ottawa were and are crucial to this work. She also works with Blackfoot language educators on various Blackfoot language revitalization initiatives. 

Candis Haak (candis.haak [at] oswego [dot] edu) is an Assistant Professor and South Asian specialist in the History Department at SUNY Oswego. Her classes incorporate data visualization, GIS and spatial analysis for the humanities, and interdisciplinary methodologies for historical research.

Erica Y. Hayes (erica.hayes [at] villanova [dot] edu) is a Digital Scholarship Librarian at Villanova University, where she supports faculty and students developing digital humanities projects. Prior to joining Villanova University, she was an NCSU Libraries Fellow at the NC State University Libraries, where she was the project manager on the Immersive Scholar Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant. She holds a Master of Information Science and Master of Library Science from Indiana University, Bloomington and an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from California State University, Long Beach. Her breadth of research interests includes material culture and 18th-century studies, women’s studies, contemporary poetry and poetics, scholarly communication, and digital humanities. She and Kacie Wills have a forthcoming essay on Sarah Sophia Banks’s collections in the Routledge compendium, Women and the Art and Science of Collecting in Eighteenth-Century Europe. 

Marieke M.A. Hendriksen (marieke.hendriksen [at] huc [dot] knaw [dot] nl) is a historian of early modern science and art. She has published widely on material culture, sensory perception, and embodiment in knowledge production. She is a researcher at the Humanities Cluster of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) in Amsterdam, and a principal investigator on Art DATIS, a DH project on the history of glass as an artistic material at Utrecht University, the Netherlands. She was a postdoctoral researcher on Artechne: Technique in the Arts 1500-1950, from February 2016 until September 2019. http://www.mariekehendriksen.nl  

Arun Jacob (arun.jacob [at] mail [dot] utoronto [dot] ca) is currently pursuing his PhD in Information Studies (Media, Technology & Culture) at the University of Toronto. He is a technologist, communicator, and educator whose interests include but are not limited to studying critical innovation studies, and developing literacies in media archaeology.

Marie-Odile Junker (marieodilejunker [at] cunet [dot] carleton [dot] ca), born and raised in France, wondered why Indigenous languages and people were so invisible when she arrived in Canada in the late 80s. She is a Professor of Linguistics at Carleton University. For the last 20 years, she has been exploring how information and communication technologies can help Indigenous languages, using a participatory-action research methodology. She has developed several websites and online dictionaries for languages of the Algonquian family (East Cree, Innu, Atikamekw). She is leading the co-creation of the Algonquian Linguistic Atlas: www.atlas-ling.ca, a large collaborative project that is building a digital infrastructure for Algonquian dictionaries and other resources. 

Daniel Paul O’Donnell (daniel.odonnell [at] uleth [dot] edu) is Professor of English, Associate Member of the University Library Academic Staff, and member of the Centre for the Study of Scholarly Communication at the University of Lethbridge. He is the editor-in-chief of Digital Studies / Le champ numérique,  chair of the Steering Committee for the FORCE11 Scholarly Communications Institute, and a former chair/president of FORCE11, the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI), Global Outlook::Digital Humanities, Digital Medievalist, and the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities/Société canadienne des humanités numériques. He is the PI on the SSHRC-funded “Future Commons” project, which explores cross-cultural implications and implementations of Open Science and Scholarship. He was born in Toronto to Scottish immigrant parents and was educated at the University of Toronto (BA) and Yale University (MA/PhD).

Paulina Rousseau (paulina.rousseau [at] utoronto [dot] ca) is a Special Collections Librarian who has worked for the University of Toronto Scarborough Library since 2008 in a variety of roles, including Operations Analyst, Digital Scholarship Librarian, Interim Coordinator of Collection Development, and Liaison Librarian for the Arts, Culture, and Media departments. In addition to liaising with faculty members around research, collections, and instruction, she supports digital collections and archives building and organization. She holds an advanced degree in Communications, and has worked in roles ranging from fundraising and grant writing to sponsor engagement to event planning for small non-profit organizations. She is the founder of the Digital Pedagogy Institute (DPI), now in its seventh iteration. She is the current Vice-Chair of the Ontario Chapter of the Art Libraries Society of North America, Ontario Chapter, and serves as a Board Member for both CPAMO and Musicworks Magazine. Prior to her time at UTSC Library, she worked for the Planning and Development Department of the Toronto Public Library.

Serenity Sutherland (serenity.sutherland [at] oswego [dot] edu) is an Assistant Professor of Communication Studies at SUNY Oswego where she teaches digital media, technology and culture, and women's and gender studies. Her research interests include digital humanities, women's history, and the history of science and technology.

Evan Peter Williamson (ewilliamson [at] uidaho [dot] edu) is the Digital Infrastructure Librarian (Assistant Professor) at the University of Idaho Library, working with Data & Digital Services to bring cool projects, enlightening workshops, and innovative services to life. Despite a background in Art History, Classical Studies, and Archives, he always manages to get involved in all things digital. He is active in a variety of digital humanities research projects based at the Center for Digital Inquiry and Learning. His recent focus has been on data driven, minimal infrastructure Web development, currently embodied in the CollectionBuilder project.

Kacie L. Wills (kacie.wills [at] ic [dot] edu) is an Assistant Professor of English at Illinois College. Her research is in the literature and material culture of the long eighteenth-century and the Romantic period.  Her book project, Fancy, Spectacle, and the Materiality of the Romantic Imagination in Pacific Exploration Culture, examines aspects of popular culture surrounding late eighteenth-century Pacific exploration and the effects of Pacific voyages on the Romantic understanding of the fanciful imagination. She is the recent recipient of the Keats-Shelley Association of America’s Pforzheimer Research Grant and the Huntington Library’s Dibner Fellowship in the History of Science. Wills is co-editor of the forthcoming book, Women and the Art and Science of Collecting in Eighteenth-Century Europe, which will be published by Routledge in 2020. She has forthcoming articles in the Keats-Shelley Journal and Romantic Circles Pedagogies Commons. This essay developed out of an ongoing digital project on the collections of Sarah Sophia Banks with Erica Hayes: Exploring the Collections of Sarah Sophia Banks sarahsophiabanks.com.






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