Skip to main content

Biographies & Contact

Published onDec 09, 2022
Biographies & Contact
·

Editors

Graham Jensen (ghjensen.com) is a Mitacs Accelerate / INKE Partnership Postdoctoral Fellow in Open, Collaborative Scholarship (Arts & Humanities) in the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab at the University of Victoria. He is also Principal Investigator of the Canadian Modernist Magazines Project. Previously at the University of Victoria, he was a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow in English. His research interests include twentieth-century Canadian literatures, global modernisms, literature and religion, and digital humanities approaches to open publishing, pedagogy, and community-building.

Lindsey Seatter (lindsey [dot] seatter [at] kpu [dot] ca) holds a PhD in English from U Victoria and is a Faculty Member at Kwantlen Polytechnic U, where she teaches literature and composition. Broadly, Seatter’s research focuses on the British Romantic period, women’s writing, and Digital Humanities. Her SSHRC-funded dissertation explored the evolution of Jane Austen’s narrative style across her manuscript and print works. Seatter has given presentations at national and international conferences on female literary networks, reading Jane Austen with computers, expanding the Romantic literary canon (#Bigger6), and digital pedagogy. In addition to her teaching, Seatter is the Managing Editor of IDEAH, an Associate Director of DHSI, and an Associated Researcher with the ETCL.

Caroline Winter (www.carolinewinter.com) is a Mitacs Accelerate and INKE Partnership Postdoctoral Fellow in Open Social Scholarship in the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (ETCL) at the University of Victoria. She holds a PhD in English from UVic, specializing in British Romantic literature, and is currently an MLIS candidate at the University of Alberta's School of Library and Information Studies.

Authors

Alyssa Arbuckle (alyssaarbuckle.com) is the Associate Director of the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab at the University of Victoria, where she is Operational Lead for the Implementing New Knowledge Environments Partnership and a co-facilitator of its Connection cluster. With her colleagues Randa El Khatib and Ray Siemens she is a Co-Director of the Digital Humanities Summer Institute. Alyssa holds an interdisciplinary PhD from the University of Victoria; her dissertation focused on open social scholarship and its implementation.

Haley Bryant (she/they) is a doctoral candidate in the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto researching digital-first museum projects through the lenses of labour studies, media materialism, and critical operational museology. Before starting her program at the University of Toronto, Haley spent three years as a digitization specialist in the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History after earning her MA in Museum Anthropology from the George Washington University in 2016. 

Samuel Clark (shmuelda.clark@msmail.ariel.ac.il) is a PhD candidate at Ariel University. He is a researcher in the MAPA project and is writing his thesis on the historical geography of Uruk at the Age of Empires. He is currently developing methods in analysing remote sensing data from ancient Mesopotamia with machine learning algorithms.

Melinda Cohoon (mecohoon [at] uw [dot] com) is a doctoral candidate in Interdisciplinary Near and Middle Eastern Studies at University of Washington-Seattle. With funding from the SSRC’s Social Data Research and Dissertation Fellowship and Roshan Cultural Heritage Institute, her dissertation explores Iranian and Iranian American gamers in World of Warcraft and social media by tracing how these spaces create affective entanglements, increase the spread disinformation through alt-right sentiments, and promote community building. Cohoon’s digital humanities work, namely Digital Iran (digitaliranproject.com) and Digital Borderlands (iranianvideogames.com/cms), looks specifically at video games as tools of state and non-state actors through theoretical frameworks of soft power and discourse. http://melindacohoon.com/.

Shai Gordin (shaigo@ariel.ac.il) is an Assyriologist and historian of the ancient Near East. He is also a digital humanist and founding director of the Digital Pasts Lab. He has published on the cuneiform scribal culture of the Hittite Empire and on Babylonian economy, cult, and history. Shai is currently the PI of the Babylonian Engine and MAPA projects. His interests include text analysis, remote sensing and landscape studies, machine identification and translation of cuneiform signs, human and machine cooperation, and linked open data. 

Jon Heggestad is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Digital Studies Program at Davidson College. His research is located at the intersection of queer studies and the digital humanities, focusing on representations of queer family-making across media forms. His recent work has appeared in peer-reviewed journals that include Screen Bodies, Queer Studies in Media & Popular Culture, and Transformative Works and Cultures, as well as through more public-facing platforms, such as Inside Higher Ed, Public Books, and Input Magazine.

Nelanthi Hewa studies journalism labour, sexual violence news coverage, and the public/private online at the University of Toronto's Faculty of Information. Her work has been published in Feminist Media Studies, First Monday, and Journalism Studies.

Marisa Hicks-Alcaraz is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate in the Department of Media and Cinema Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her transdisciplinary research brings together media studies, digital humanities, latinx studies, latin american studies, public humanities, critical archives studies, feminist studies, and media arts production. Her writing has appeared in the Journal of Feminist Media Histories, UC Press Blog, Reviews in Digital Humanities, and has a forthcoming article in the International Journal of Information, Diversity & Inclusion. Marisa has also curated film programs in collaboration with museums and organizations including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Vincent Price Art Museum; Watsonville Film Festival; Chicano International Film Festival; Markaz, Center for the Greater Middle East; and the Latin American Cinemateca of Los Angeles.

Katherine Hoovestol is a Media Studies MA student at the University of Texas at Austin in the Department of Radio-Television-Film. Her current research concentrates on the ways in which industrially constructed audiences are reconstituted across different distribution methods, with a specific focus on streaming platforms and otherwise non-linear distribution. Her undergraduate research at the University of Georgia (B.A. in Entertainment & Media Studies and B.A. in German) focused on how fan labour is commodified and codified by industrial practices in the transnational distribution space. 

Camille Intson (she/her) is an award-winning artist and researcher whose practice spans writing, performance, music, new media, emerging technology, and speculative fiction. Her doctoral research examines the ways in which queer and feminist creators are using emerging technological tools and techniques (for example, virtual reality, intermedial performance, and algorithmic technologies) within contemporary arts praxis to resist cisheteropatriarchal and colonial-capitalist frameworks of viewing and experiencing. Her research engages works from discrete practitioners, as well as her own research-creation, to understand how these technologies are somatically engaging the polylithic experience of queer embodiment. More at camilleintson.com and @thecamiliad.

Arun Jacob (he/him) is a doctoral candidate at the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto. Arun's work unites media genealogy, intersectional feminist media studies, and critical university studies to explore how contemporary university data management techniques and information management systems shape our sociocultural relations, experiences, and knowledge. Arun is the first recipient of the Stéfan Sinclair Memorial Scholarship from the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities for his work on critical digital humanities. Arun's publications have appeared in Interdisciplinary Digital Engagement in Arts & Humanities (IDEAH), Digital Studies/Le champ numérique, The College Quarterly and Alternative Historiographies of the Digital Humanities.

Graham Jensen (ghjensen.com) is a Mitacs Accelerate / INKE Partnership Postdoctoral Fellow in Open, Collaborative Scholarship (Arts & Humanities) in the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab at the University of Victoria. He is also Principal Investigator of the Canadian Modernist Magazines Project. Previously at the University of Victoria, he was a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow in English. His research interests include twentieth-century Canadian literatures, global modernisms, literature and religion, and digital humanities approaches to open publishing, pedagogy, and community-building.

Talya Jesperson (talya.is) is a research assistant at the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab located at the University of Victoria Library. She contributes to the lab’s communication activities across various online platforms and assists with collaborative research projects and planning conferences and events. Talya recently completed her Master’s degree in Sociology with a concentration in Cultural, Social, and Political Thought (CSPT) from the University of Victoria. She also holds a BA Honours in Sociology with a minor in Technology and Society. Her research interests are in science and technology studies (STS), artificial intelligence and machine learning, surveillance, techno-social life, decentralizing big tech, and digital knowledge commons.

Elena Mattei (elena.mattei@univr.it) is a PhD candidate in Digital Humanities for English Studies at the University of Verona. Her research interests focus on the collection, annotation, and analysis of tourism multimodal corpora on social media, with particular attention to Visual Design and Systemic Functional Linguistics theories. She has published in Digital Humanities venues and holds workshops on empirical research. The main aim of her doctoral research is to provide insights into novel legitimization strategies of tourism discourse and to provide evidence of the importance of data-driven multimodal research in the burgeoning field of Digital Humanities from a methodological, sociological, and multisemiotic perspective.

Sebastian Rodriguez (www.srod.ca) is an undergraduate student at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Information. He is a research assistant for the Failure: Learning in Progress project, where he’s developing a platform to host and share OERs for failure resiliency in higher education. He previously received a research fellowship from the Critical Digital Humanities Initiative (CDHI) to investigate deceptive design, culminating in a resource used to teach over 800 undergraduate students. Sebastian’s research interests include human-computer interaction, digital sociology, and surveillance studies.

Avital Romach (avitalromach@tauex.tau.ac.il) is an MA student of Assyriology at Tel Aviv University, and a researcher at the Digital Pasts Lab. She focuses on the creation of digital scholarly editions for cuneiform texts, and the implementation of digital humanities methodologies in traditional philological research. Her thesis provides a new digital scholarly edition, analysis, and commentary of the fifth tablet of Gilgamesh.

Ray Siemens (siemens [at] uvic [dot] ca) is Distinguished Professor in the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Victoria, Canada, in English and Computer Science, and past Canada Research Chair in Humanities Computing; in 2019, he was also Leverhulme Visiting Professor at U Loughborough and, 2019-22, Global Innovation Chair in Digital Humanities in the Centre for 21st Century Humanities at U Newcastle. He is founding editor of the electronic scholarly journal Early Modern Literary Studies, and his publications include, among others, Blackwell's Companion to Digital Humanities (2004, 2015 with Schreibman and Unsworth), the Companion to Digital Literary Studies (2007, with Schreibman), A Social Edition of the Devonshire MS (2012, 2015; MRTS/Iter & Wikibooks, with Crompton et al.), Literary Studies in the Digital Age (2014; MLA, with Price), Doing Digital Humanities (2017; Routledge, with Crompton and Lane), and The Lyrics of the Henry VIII MS (2018; RETS). He directs the Implementing New Knowledge Environments project, the Digital Humanities Summer Institute, and the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, recently serving as a member of governing council for the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, as Vice President / Director of the Canadian Federation of the Humanities and Social Sciences (for Research Dissemination), Chair of the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions, and Chair of the international Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations.

Martina Vodola is currently a PhD candidate at Catholic University of the Sacred Heart (UCSC) of Milan (Italy) with a project on Italian Electronic Literature. She is a teaching assistant in “Multimedia and Printed Publishing” at UCSC and collaborates with UCSC publishing workshops for students. She was the Italian Visiting Language Coordinator at the University of Mary Washington (Virginia, USA) for the academic year 2019–2020, when she started her studies on new media and technologies. Her scholarly work focuses on contemporary literature and its impact on the publishing industry. Her research on Sebastiano Vassalli and his experimental artistic phase led to the first critical edition of De l’infinito, universi e mondi. In 2021 she curated L’Europa letteraria written by Italian critic Giancarlo Vigorelli. As a freelance journalist, she works for the newspaper Epeople, writing about technologies, the environment, and the right to education.

Caroline Winter (www.carolinewinter.com) is a Mitacs Accelerate and INKE Partnership Postdoctoral Fellow in Open Social Scholarship in the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (ETCL) at the University of Victoria. She holds a PhD in English from UVic, specializing in British Romantic literature, and is currently an MLIS candidate at the University of Alberta's School of Library and Information Studies.

 

Comments
0
comment
No comments here
Why not start the discussion?